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Total War: Shogun 2 Heaven » Forums » Total War History » The Quick Question Thread
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Topic Subject:The Quick Question Thread
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Legio Yow
Ashigaru
posted 01-23-07 09:42 AM EDT (US)         
I decided we needed one of these.

The purpose of this thread is for little questions that have objective answers, and don't merit their own thread. For example, a good question you might ask here is "Who was the emperor who built the Colosseum?" or "Where can I find a description of the Battle of Alesia?". You can also use this if you are having trouble finding previous discussions in this forum. For example, you might ask "Where can I find a detailed description of the mechanics of a corpse bridge?", which would receive an answer.

This thread is not for introducing discussion topics. You do not ask "So, who was better. Genghis Khan or Alexander the Great?". Think of it as the AH equivalent of the Roman Party thread but do not spam.

If your query starts to get replies beyond two or three posts, then consider starting a specific thread if it looks set to run. If it gets to six or seven posts, start a specific thread on it.

This forum has needed this for a while. Please obey the rules.


"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry

[This message has been edited by Legio Yow (edited 01-23-2007 @ 05:15 PM).]

AuthorReplies:
Kor
Busschof Happertesch
(id: Derfel Cadarn)
posted 08-04-08 03:17 PM EDT (US)     151 / 188       
A second question: how does one pronounce Blücher's name? Is it "Bloo-sher", "Bloo-cher", "Bloo-ker", or what?
Blue-cher is the cloest you can get to it in English, with the ch more or less pronounced as in the Scottish loch. Although I heard that most English can't actually pronounce that, so I don't know if that's any help.

Kor | The Age of Chivalry is upon us!
Wellent ich gugk, so hindert mich / köstlicher ziere sinder,
Der ich e pflag, da für ich sich / Neur kelber, gaiss, böck, rinder,
Und knospot leut, swarz, hässeleich, / Vast rüssig gen dem winder;
Die geben müt als sackwein vich. / Vor angst slach ich mein kinder
Offt hin hinder.
dudeitsthatdude
Ashigaru
posted 09-15-08 01:15 AM EDT (US)     152 / 188       
hey can anyone delete the closed threads...its kind of useless to close a thread anyways unless you cannot delete it or you dont want someone else to copy it in which case you would hope the next would follow the suggestions for the last and improve and eventually not fail completely? anywho i just think this forum is getting rather messy and too much inactive stuff floating around so if someone wouldnt mind clearing the dust and letting the new prosper thatd be nice thnx
Kor
Busschof Happertesch
(id: Derfel Cadarn)
posted 09-20-08 06:26 AM EDT (US)     153 / 188       
Closed threads are only made invisible when the content therein is completely inflammatory and of no value. This is not the case with the recently closed topics.

Kor | The Age of Chivalry is upon us!
Wellent ich gugk, so hindert mich / köstlicher ziere sinder,
Der ich e pflag, da für ich sich / Neur kelber, gaiss, böck, rinder,
Und knospot leut, swarz, hässeleich, / Vast rüssig gen dem winder;
Die geben müt als sackwein vich. / Vor angst slach ich mein kinder
Offt hin hinder.
Pertti Susilainen
OD Loaf-ward
(id: Sukkit)
posted 09-20-08 06:45 AM EDT (US)     154 / 188       
About Blücher: the initial sound in huge is probably as close as you can get to the German ch (the ich-Laut, or "ich sound", in this case). To pronounce ü, say i (as in 'bit') with rounded lips. The -r is silent (kind of).

Hu seo þrag gewat, genap under nihthelm, swa heo no wære
"As for the comment made by eithyddyswcitwr, could you please post back with better grammar that we can all understand, thankyou."
Winner of Sul's Most Obvious Comment Award
Tsunami StudiosWildfire Games
The Frankish Throne (4.6)
Andalus
Ashigaru
posted 10-09-08 11:18 AM EDT (US)     155 / 188       
I've been wondering, what is the reason for shields not being commonly used in the far east, such as in medieval Japan and China?

Did they develop greater use of two handed weapons because they used no shields, or vice versa?

Or maybe because they didn't have the materials?

[This message has been edited by Andalus (edited 10-09-2008 @ 11:18 AM).]

Jonny 5
Ashigaru
posted 10-30-08 05:59 AM EDT (US)     156 / 188       
In reply to Andalus' question about shields- i think you were right when pondering the whole two-handed weapon thang. The samurai sword had to be used two-handed to get maximum effectiveness, thus a shield could not be used. I think that they would have had the materials for shields- if they could make armour, shields would not be too much of a stretch!
Or maybe the East just thought shields were a bit 'wussy'

Cordyceps
Naphal
(id: ArchDruid)
posted 10-30-08 03:35 PM EDT (US)     157 / 188       
Most shields from the Roman period onwards were basically wood with a metal boss and rim. I doubt the apparent absence of shields had much to do with materials, though I can't offer an explanation either.

Just as some bodies, from the moment of birth, are endowed with beauty, while on others nature from their very beginning bestows blemishes and wrinkles, so with souls too, some are distinguished at once with extreme grace and attractiveness, while others leave a trail of sombre and deep gloom. ~Michael Psellus, Chronographia
MisplacedPope
Ashigaru
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 10-30-08 03:51 PM EDT (US)     158 / 188       
Most likely a greater degree of importance placed on missile weapons. By this, I mean most soldiers (Take the Samuri for an example) used bows as well as melee weapons. Therefore a shield could cause interference (Though many Western nations used a smaller round shield in these cases, one could argue armor and such)

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson
Legio Yow
Ashigaru
posted 10-30-08 04:17 PM EDT (US)     159 / 188       
I've been wondering, what is the reason for shields not being commonly used in the far east, such as in medieval Japan and China?
The lack of resources may have been a contributing factor in Japan. Most people don't realize this, but Japan is a startlingly poor country. It has not a single notable raw material and crappy agriculture (despite superb agricultural technique). As for China, I have no idea. It may be because for much of its history significant numbers of troops were recruited from the Steppes, and would likely have a weak infantry tradition.

"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry
Roman Warlord
Ashigaru
posted 10-30-08 06:14 PM EDT (US)     160 / 188       
I think prehaps the answer would lie if you look at militia in western europe, who were of roughly the same standard as the eastern foot troop.

While esentially farmers would have spears and bows for hunting, axes for wood.... , there would not be a every day use for a sheild so most didn't have one.

A very few might have a old sword that had been inherited, a shield prusumembly would only last a few years before rotting/ wood been canabalised for something else.


P.s. should this have its own topic?
Legio Yow
Ashigaru
posted 12-02-08 04:02 PM EDT (US)     161 / 188       
I'm not sure where to put it, but I found a great little website. It illustrates battles, with a focus on less famous ones (Gettysburg, Cannae, and Pharsalus are not on here, but Yarmouk, Mukden, and Ilpia are).

http://the-art-of-battle.350.com/The_Battles.htm

"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry
Roman Warlord
Ashigaru
posted 12-02-08 06:53 PM EDT (US)     162 / 188       
Nice find.

Not great detail but it adds images to words of other sources.

Have to read more about some of those less known battles.
Rex84
Ashigaru
posted 12-06-08 01:48 PM EDT (US)     163 / 188       
Did Carthage use camel cavalry during the Punic Wars? I've Googled this and the results seem ambiguous...

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis
MisplacedPope
Ashigaru
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 12-06-08 02:22 PM EDT (US)     164 / 188       
I have never heard of such a proposition, and surely something of that nature would be mentioned.

In fact, I am not quite sure there are Camels in Western Mediterranean/Africa territories.

Therefore I'll say no.

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson
Rex84
Ashigaru
posted 12-06-08 02:35 PM EDT (US)     165 / 188       
Yes, camels are still big in Tunisia as a form of transportation. They were introduced to Egypt by the Persians around 500 BC, and the Numidians used them in their armies after the fall of Carthage. I just can't seem to find a definitive answer about Carthage using them in their armies, which leads me to believe that they probably didn't.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis
Legio Yow
Ashigaru
posted 12-06-08 04:52 PM EDT (US)     166 / 188       
Camels are peerless when used in scouting and raiding. They make superb light cavalry. But they aren't as useful in pitched battle. While men on camels were surely used by both sides in their scouting capacity (if, as you say, they were brought to Tunisia in 500BC), they would likely have not been used in actual battle.

"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry
Edorix
High King of Britain
posted 12-14-08 04:24 AM EDT (US)     167 / 188       
This being a quick question thread, here's a quote question; the RTW thing says it's Tacitus, but he must have put in the mouth of some charismatic barbarian general, and Wikipedia says it's Calgacus, but Wikipedia isn't particularly reliable. Who was it?
-"Solitudinem faciunt, pacem apellant!"
-"They make a desert, and call it peace!"

By the way, on the camel-thing, the Carthaginians aren't mentioned to have used them in a military capacity during the Punic Wars, but the Romans had a few units of "dromedarii" in Italy and Arabia during the principate. Not sure what they were used for, probably scouts. And whilst we're talking about camels, there weren't any in Egypt until the Roman conquest!

• EDORIX •
~ ancient briton ~

/\
/|||| ||||\

(dis ma house)

[This message has been edited by Edorix (edited 12-14-2008 @ 04:28 AM).]

Gallowglass
Ashigaru
posted 12-14-08 05:11 AM EDT (US)     168 / 188       
That was Calgaich, or Calgacus, alright:

'We, the most distant dwellers on earth, the last of the free, have been shielded till today by our remoteness and the obscurity in which it has surrounded our name. But there are no more nations beyond us; nothing is there but rocks and waves now, and more still - the Romans ... They make a desert (desecration), and they call it peace!'

A few of my books disagree that he said 'desert,' instead claiming that he said 'desecration,' so I have put both. But it was Calgaich, at Mons Graupius, who said something like that.

------m------m------
(o o)
(~)

Monkey beats bunny. Please put Monkey in your signature to prevent the rise of bunny.
m0n|<3yz r 2 pwn n00b

[This message has been edited by Gallowglass (edited 12-14-2008 @ 05:13 AM).]

Palatine warrior
Ashigaru
posted 12-31-08 07:25 PM EDT (US)     169 / 188       
Sorry if this has been posted before, but what was the point of phalangites having what basically amounted to a saucer hanging from their necks, surely this would only impede any close quarter combat should the phalanx break ranks?

I'm not playing all the wrong notes. I'm playing all the right notes. But not
nessescarily in the right order.- Eric Morcambe.
I have the body of a GOD!- Buddha...
www.Nottinghamrugby.co.uk
They have sown the wind, now they will reap the whirlwind.- Arthur "bomber" Harris.
Octavium
Ashigaru
posted 01-01-09 08:15 AM EDT (US)     170 / 188       
I'm not an expert on these, but as I recall the plan was for the phalanx not to break ranks and embark on close quarters combat, so it didn't really matter. Indeed the whole point of the phalanx was to hold ranks at all costs.
Palatine warrior
Ashigaru
posted 01-01-09 01:58 PM EDT (US)     171 / 188       
I'm not saying the phalanx wasn't intended not to break , but surely say strapping the shield to the arm or simply wearing heavier armour would be more practical in the case that the phalanx broke ranks, perhaps I should have clarified that in the origional question, I apologise.

I'm not playing all the wrong notes. I'm playing all the right notes. But not
nessescarily in the right order.- Eric Morcambe.
I have the body of a GOD!- Buddha...
www.Nottinghamrugby.co.uk
They have sown the wind, now they will reap the whirlwind.- Arthur "bomber" Harris.
Porphyrogenitus
Ashigaru
posted 01-01-09 09:27 PM EDT (US)     172 / 188       
The disk hanging from their necks was for one thing and one thing only: to protect against archers. It was intended to ensure that arrows and other missiles would not pierce the hearts of the pikemen. Helmets took care of protecting the heads, so the heart was the most important place left vulnerable to arrows. It was much cheaper and lighter than a full cuirass would have been.

0 Lord, save thy people and bless thine inheritance:
To our Rulers grant victories over the barbarians,
And by thy Cross protect thine own Estate.

- Prayer on the Feast of the Elevation of the Cross (September 14), established by Heraclius, Basileus (610-41), after recovering the True Cross from its captivity by the Persians and the utter defeat of the Sassanians by Roman arms.

Legio Yow
Ashigaru
posted 02-15-09 05:19 PM EDT (US)     173 / 188       
I would like to request that a mod reopen my "Decisive Battles that Weren't" thread. I have an entry that should prove controversial (well, depending on how many Medievalists there are).

"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry
Bulba Khan
Ashigaru
(id: stormer)
posted 02-15-09 05:27 PM EDT (US)     174 / 188       
Does anybody know a novel about the Punic war were Hannibal is the winner or any other well-known history event for that matter.

I feel the same way I did after playing Stronghold 2 for about 15 minutes, like it was my birthday and all my friends had wheeled a giant birthday cake into the room, and I was filled with hopes dreams and desires when suddenly out of the cake pops out not a beautiful buxom maid, but a cranky old hobo that just shanks me then takes $60 dollars out of my pocket and walks away saying "deal, with it".
MisplacedPope
Ashigaru
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 02-15-09 10:43 PM EDT (US)     175 / 188       
Huh? You mean a 'what if?' novel? Yea, Hannibal's Children. I've been tempted to make a thread on it. Here's why.

It isn't necessarily good writing, and the story progresses too quickly near the end and leaves you feeling empty. However, what the author tries to do is interesting. That is, he tries to make the Roman state the same as it was in 100 BC in reality as it is in the Roman state in his book.

See, Hannibal wins and Romans are forced into exile, the whole city. they march north up to the Danube, establish a kingdom up there, yada yada yada. 100 years later, Oracles and portents signal them to return to their homeland.

There is a huge amount of competition between two groups of Senators, the old Roman senators and the new Senators made up of the local nobility. This is meant to mirror the division of new and old families that occurred at roughly the same time. Marius is an example.

The government is the same, but one thing that has occurred differently is that there is no real strong Greek influence. Therefore, the distinctive Roman virtues are still quite present in the people. This is a contrast with the rest of the world (Ruled primarily by the Carthaginians and the Ptolemies, the Seleucids suffering from the attacks of the Parthians)

Anyhow, he tries to describe the switch over to the Eagles as being the standard for all the Legions as being a result of no more animals being available for the new Legions called up. This also goes to a new design of helmet and sword (Which resemble the gradual transitions that occurred in reality at this time period)

In the story Carthage took Syracuse and Archimedes found shelter in Alexandria, therefore the Museum there has a large Archimedian school, and they develop all sorts of things, like periscopes and under sea boats, which would not come about until much later.

He has a Ptolemaic queen who is quite youthful and beautiful, but whose image upon coins is that of an old hag. I thought this a clever attempt at turning her into CLeopatra (and therefore explaining Cleopatra, that is, she was actually beautiful but her coins were given false images since the people would not be confidant following a young beauty)

Others things like this occur, kind of interesting. Like I said though, the writing is not very good and generally consist of oversimplification of battle and sexually directed speech. Simplistic and not complete enough.

If you want Historical fiction, try 'I Claudius' or 'The Name of the Rose'.

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson
Rex84
Ashigaru
posted 02-18-09 08:11 PM EDT (US)     176 / 188       
On the topic of historical fiction, Ross Leckie wrote a pretty good one called "Hannibal."
It takes some getting used to because it's written in the first person, but worth a read.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis
MisplacedPope
Ashigaru
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 02-18-09 08:14 PM EDT (US)     177 / 188       
What is it about? My two favorite historical fictions are written in the first person (To two above-mentioned, I, Claudius and Name of the Rose) but in a manner of looking back at events that had already occurred. Is it similar in style?

Edit: On the topic, another favorite of mine is Last of the Mohicans. Ironically, all three of those named have excellent films TV series based on them (Though I have not seen the whole series for I, Claudius, from what I have seen and heard it is extraordinarily well acted).

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson

[This message has been edited by MisplacedPope (edited 02-18-2009 @ 08:16 PM).]

Rex84
Ashigaru
posted 02-18-09 08:24 PM EDT (US)     178 / 188       
Hannibal is basically a fictional memoir... it's Hannibal, as an old man in Asia Minor about to kill himself, retelling the story of his life as he is about to die, sort of like one big diary entry.
Ross Leckie knows a lot about that era, so there are a lot of interesting details.
Apparently Vin Diesel is using it as the screenplay for the Second Punic War movie he's making, so hopefully that will be good.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis
MisplacedPope
Ashigaru
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 02-18-09 08:30 PM EDT (US)     179 / 188       
Ah, so it is pretty much Hannibal's "I, Claudius"

If you enjoyed the style, read Grave's work, absolutely wonderful.

If I remember to do so, next time I order some books I'll check out the prices on Hannibal.

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson
Rex84
Ashigaru
posted 02-18-09 08:36 PM EDT (US)     180 / 188       
Yeah, I'll check out 'I Claudius' too... one of my friends has it and said it's definitely worth reading.

While we're on this topic... has anyone here read Gore Vidal's "Creation"?

One other thing... Kor, who is that guy in your avatar? I know I've seen him before, and it's driving me nuts trying to figure out who it is.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis

[This message has been edited by Rex84 (edited 02-18-2009 @ 08:40 PM).]

Kor
Busschof Happertesch
(id: Derfel Cadarn)
posted 02-19-09 01:18 AM EDT (US)     181 / 188       
It's Frederick Barbarossa, as drawn in the Welfenchronik (full image here. It's quite well known and I recently discovered it's also used on the Dutch edition cover of Umberto Eco's Baudolino (which deals in part with Frederick Barbarossa). Not sure about different language editions.

Kor | The Age of Chivalry is upon us!
Wellent ich gugk, so hindert mich / köstlicher ziere sinder,
Der ich e pflag, da für ich sich / Neur kelber, gaiss, böck, rinder,
Und knospot leut, swarz, hässeleich, / Vast rüssig gen dem winder;
Die geben müt als sackwein vich. / Vor angst slach ich mein kinder
Offt hin hinder.
Enkidu of Uruk
Ashigaru
(id: thekid951)
posted 09-16-09 08:10 AM EDT (US)     182 / 188       
"The development and perfection of the Roman Legion" will be the subject of my coursework , a six-month study and research which will end with a 30 page essay and presentation.

But is there a lot of information on this subject? How much is known about the Roman armies and the evolution in it?
If I'm not mistaking, there's pretty much info on the subject and I shouldn't worry. Still, I ask you. Thanks

edit: Also, my three research questions would be :

1) How did the Roman military come to be the most effective military force in Europe?

2) How did the Roman Empire control conquered territories and integrate them into their Empire?

3) What caused the decline and eventual failure of the Roman military to defend the Empire?

Do these make sense?

[This message has been edited by TheKid951 (edited 09-16-2009 @ 08:21 AM).]

Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 09-16-09 08:37 AM EDT (US)     183 / 188       
They make sense, but they can also have incredibly long and arduous explanations.

How did the Roman military become so effective: trial and error, weapons suited to tactics and tactics to weapons, and logistics- a lot of logistics.

The second question contains more political answers than military ones. Romanization was a process, and took a long time. Political and religious measures were more an influence than military.

The third will be the hardest- it combines military and technological advance with political instability, new forms of warfare, population pressure outside the empire versus decline of soldier quality and quantity inside, economic factors, and an overall feeling of apathy that was permeating the Empire in its final years.

People write books covering any one of these questions- and you will be trying to answer all three thoroughly.

Good luck!

|||||||||||||||| A transplanted Viking, born a millennium too late. |||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Too many Awards to list in Signature, sorry lords...|||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Listed on my page for your convenience and envy.|||||||||||||||||
Somewhere over the EXCO Rainbow
Master Skald, Order of the Silver Quill, Guild of the Skalds
Champion of the Sepia Joust- Joust I, II, IV, VI, VII, VIII
Enkidu of Uruk
Ashigaru
(id: thekid951)
posted 09-16-09 10:38 AM EDT (US)     184 / 188       
Thanks. Do you think the research questions could be improven, like the second one? In fact, all three of them were just suggestions from someone else on a forum, and I'm not completely convinced wether they are good enough or not.

The first question, "How did the Roman military come to be the most effective military force in Europe?" is good, I think. However, I think I might adjust the second one, because, as you said, it's rather political than militarily. The third one seems reasonable aswell.

I'll be reading a lot of books, so I'm heading to the library now.

Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 09-16-09 11:16 AM EDT (US)     185 / 188       
I'd just drop the whole Romanization question completely, and stick to the military.

After discussing the evolution and rise of the legionary and his weapons, you could try this as a second question:

How did the Romans sustain this military from Augustus to the Decline of Rome?

This includes the evolution of the legions into limitani and palatine legions, the growing importance of mobility, an the entire logistics chain from producer of food to consumer (the legionary), and all the noncombatants needed to make a legion function.
Legio Yow
Ashigaru
posted 09-16-09 02:57 PM EDT (US)     186 / 188       
There is a pretty good amount of information on the development of Roman arms. You will have to use lots of extrapolation for the beginning, but books have been filled with discussions of Roman military evolution.

"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry
GabrielBrasil
Ashigaru
posted 09-11-10 09:33 AM EDT (US)     187 / 188       
I have a question:

Who exactly was Skanderbeg?I heard about him once but I didn't found much.

"Quem perdoa é Deus.Nós estamos aqui para adiantar o encontro com Ele."
BOPE Commander when asked what they would do with the Drug Dealers.
Gnarlyhotep
Ashigaru
posted 09-13-10 03:06 PM EDT (US)     188 / 188       
Wasn't he the Albanian who lead a resistence to the Ottoman expansion in the balkan area during the 15th century? I believe he had such success that it delayed Ottoman goals long enough to allow the Austrians and Italian states to shore up defenses and organize enough to avoid being swept under the (until then) rapid advance.
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